Some organizations want help from volunteers, but not input. Volunteers are in a position to observe an organization and can take more risks in criticizing. They also are effective community advocates when they observe things going well. It is important to create a channel for volunteer comments. Also, having the opportunity to voice opinions and make suggestions encourages greater participation in all aspects of volunteer program.

Editor's ChoiceTitleDescriptionAuthor
Strength in Numbers: Engaging Volunteers as Partners in Program DevelopmentWhy and how to form an advisory committee of volunteers to give input into volunteer program planning, procedures and long-range goals
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Susan J. Ellis
Providing a Sense of Control to VolunteersWhy give volunteers the authority to think, the authority to plan and evaluate their work?
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Steve McCurley and Rick Lynch
Volunteers and the Quest for InnovationWhere do volunteers fit into the quest for innovation and what does this mean to volunteer resources managers?
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Susan J. Ellis
Helping a Group Deal with Uncomfortable SubjectsSometimes we need to talk about difficult or controversial subjects. Here are some tips on how to surface true feelings while providing safety, whether it be among volunteers, or staff who work with volunteers.
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Susan J. Ellis