Planning is the key to success for all organizational projects, and volunteer program development is no exception. Planning for volunteers, who will be your organization’s unpaid personnel, includes a variety of decisions about: climate/readiness for volunteers; goals and objectives; budget and resources; staff preparation; and an implementation plan.

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TitleDescriptionAuthor
I’ll Never Understand Why Executives Still Don’t UnderstandVolunteering should be discussed at the highest levels, including the board
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Susan J. Ellis
What Leaders of Volunteers Can DO to Gain Executive AttentionIf you lead volunteers, eg as a volunteer coordinator, there is action you can take to leadership support for your work
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Susan J. Ellis
Part-time Volunteer Management Means Equally Limited Volunteer InvolvementWhy staff are needed to manage volunteers and why volunteer management is full-time work rather than part-time
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Susan J. Ellis
Top 10 Reasons Why Your Organization Does NOT Need Training in Volunteer ManagementTop reasons include: “Your volunteers believe so passionately about your mission that you have had to hire another accountant just to process the money they have donated as well as time.” A tongue-in-cheek approach to the importance of volunteer management
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Susan J. Ellis
Fighting Against IgnoranceSomehow, no matter how much how much is said about the importance of volunteers, they might not make it onto the agenda when planning takes place. This occurs because the volunteer resources manager is often not included in senior management meetings and cannot contribute ideas at the beginning of a new project.
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Susan J. Ellis
What Would the Perfect Volunteer-Involving Organization Look Like?Among other things, in such an organization, the board of directors would ask as many questions about volunteer involvement as about fundraising
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Susan J. Ellis
Strategic Volunteer Management: Expanding Your Organization’s BrainHow to integrate volunteers into organisational strategy
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Susan J. Ellis
Volunteers as the “Third Branch” of an OrganizationVolunteers should be treated as importantly as the other two branches: paid staff and clients/people being served.
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Susan J. Ellis
Strategic Volunteer Engagement: A Guide for Nonprofit and Public Sector LeadersLeaders should move beyond the stereotypes sometimes associated with volunteers, those images of "low-level robots available for any mindless task". Identifying who volunteers is only one step of a larger process - a process that does not begin with recruiting volunteers. The process begins with an internal assessment of your organisation. Includes template to develop a vision for volunteer engagement.
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Sarah Jane Rehnborg et al
Creating a Statement of Philosophy on Volunteer EngagementIf we had all the money we need to support the organization’s mission, would we still involve volunteers?" This is where a philosophy statement comes in.
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Betty B. Stallings with Susan J. Ellis
The Moral Obligation of Volunteer Recruitment PromisesRecruiting volunteers creates an implied promise that volunteers will be working towards a meaningful mission and will be valued partners in that work.
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Susan J. Ellis
The Difference between Needing and Wanting VolunteersSome quick questions to ask, to see how open your organization is to meaningful volunteer engagement. Volunteers can be integral to your organisation's mission and service delivery
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Susan J. Ellis
Matching the supply and demand of volunteersOrganizations that seek volunteers struggle to find enough of the right volunteers and must recognize volunteer market realities, and develop strategies
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Laurence Lien
Is the challenge recruiting citizens to volunteer or making sure agencies are ready for volunteers?Volunteers are not salaried, but resources are needed for volunteers
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Susan J. Ellis
Where should Volunteer Resources be “placed”?Identifying pros and cons for placement options of volunteer resources.
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Susan J. Ellis
Advocacy for Volunteer Involvement: The Role of FundersIf foundations, major donors, and government agencies insisted on appropriate integration of volunteers in service planning and delivery, we'd see immediate attention to volunteer management issues
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Susan J. Ellis
Education through Celebration on International Volunteer Managers DayMany people are involved in volunteer management - without realising it. This work is so important, there's even an International Volunteer Managers Day
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Susan J. Ellis
The Correlation between Time Donors and Money DonorsPeople who volunteer tend to give more money to charity than people who do not. Leaders of volunteers must position the contribution of “time donors” as a critical component of an organization's mix of resources
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Susan J. Ellis
It’s Time to Discuss the Complex Relationship of Volunteering and MoneySome volunteers pay for things to carry out volunteer programmes but are not reimbursed. Does your organisation know and thank them like donors who give only cash?
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Susan J. Ellis
Reconceptualizing The Value Of Volunteer WorkThe wage replacement approach to value volunteering captures only part of the value
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Linda L. Graff
Benefits of Policies for Volunteer ProgramsSome reasons for having a policy on working with volunteers
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Linda L. Graff
Volunteer Handbooks: A Simple GuideA volunteer handbook needn't be boring to produce or to read. You could assign "volunteer guides" to write each section. If you're short of time, pick the most important areas to start with.
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Tobi Johnson and Associates
A Quiz for Senior ManagersA conversation starter to open dialogue between you and your executive director or department heads about volunteer involvement in your organization.
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Susan J. Ellis
Donors and Volunteers – More Alike than DifferentDonors may lose interest over time, but being asked to volunteer may revitalise their commitment, even if they do not accept the invitation. So why are there concrete walls between the development office and the volunteer services office?
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Susan J. Ellis
Replace Current Volunteers or Redirect New Ones“What can volunteers do for us?” is only one half of the equation. The other half is: “Where should we put our money?” Executives tend to think only in terms of employees as the doers of the organisation’s primary work and volunteers as low-skilled assistants with some of the tasks. But in small organizations, especially, may be more effective to reward a paid staff member for spending time coordinating skilled volunteers. And one way to spend money is to hire a staff member expressly to coordinate volunteers.
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Susan J. Ellis
In Good Company, How We Can Take Corporate Partnerships Into New DimensionsCurrent models of corporate volunteering have limited potential to grow. For example, companies usually don’t like just donating money and only so many charities can absorb huge amounts of corporate ‘binge’ volunteering. But there are other ways for charities and companies to work together.
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Joe Saxton
Individual Giving Survey (2014) Supplement: Employee VolunteerismNational Volunteer & Philanthropy Centre (NVPC)’s Individual Giving Survey 2014 found that only 1 in 5 employers organised volunteering activities. Top factors that would encourage participation in employer-organised volunteer activities include support from bosses and colleagues.
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NVPC
12 Key Actions Of Volunteer Programme Champions – CEOs Who Lead The WayVolunteers give incredible hours of time to organizations to expand the services provided. Organizational leadership need to keep up with these changes and welcome, support or empower stakeholders to be effective advocates and contributors of time and money.
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Betty Stallings
It’s Volunteers and MoneyHow to ask for funds for your volunteer programme
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Susan J. Ellis
Should We Ask Volunteers to Give Money on Top of Time?Despite research showing that people who volunteer are more likely to also give cash than uninvolved people, the reluctance to ask for money from volunteers keeps the development office and the volunteer resources office operating in distinctly separate spheres
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Susan J. Ellis